Ad

12/6/12

uh hi?



So one thing I never understood growing up was the assertion that people with ADD are impulsive. I am not impulsive, generally.

For example, I remember, almost to the day, I sat in my AP U.S. History class and decided I wanted to be a History/English teacher. I was 16.

At age 22 I graduated with a Masters in arts and Teaching. I never changed my major.

Now, at age 26, I'm entering my fourth year as an English teacher with two classes that are cross curricular with...AP U.S. History.

Not exactly impulsive.

I plan. I plan and plan and plan some more. To a fault sometimes, because some plans must be abandoned, and it is really hard for me when that happens.

But yesterday, I did something impulsive: I wrote about my sometimes disillusionment with the Mormon Feminist movement, and I suggested some Civil Disobedience.

It was not a call to immediately chain ourselves to the Church Office Building, though many people took it that way. And boy howdy, spared no expense telling me how dumb they thought I was. Thanks.

I do think it is time to think about ways faithful Mormon women can engage in peaceful resistance and Civil Disobedience. I'm a planner. I know plans take time, but what yesterday represented was a call to plan, and a call to act in the best way possible for all concerned parties.

I don't want to pull the rug out from any other Mormon Feminist organizations, and I am aware that it is a delicate balance, to challenge an institution and want to remain part at the same time. That's why I suggested Civil Disobedience: to my knowledge it is the only form of protest that works to change the institution and the radical for the better.

I think Civil Disobedience comes in the form of peaceful resistance, when we simply say "no" to things that hurt our souls. I think it comes from challenging social norms on a wide-scale, like praying to Heavenly Parents in church.

I think it can also be as a big as a pray-in, an service project, or a media campaign.

The possibilities are endless, all I know is that I'm tired of seeing my Mormon Feminist sisters die a slow spiritual death.

So, again, impulsively, I started a group on Facebook. Because I am Facebook illiterate, I did not close the group initially, and probably offended a lot of people when I started posting non-stop and clogging up their stalker feeds. (A trait characteristic of ADD that I do have? The ability to hyper-focus for brief, and prolific periods of time.)

The group is called All Enlisted. The administrators are working on a mission statement, and the members are brainstorming ways to faithfully and peacefully advance feminist causes within the church. I hope to see you there if you are interested, because this is your fight.

Thanks for listening. I now return this blog to the realm of bad-TV, excessive swears, and general tom-ragery.




21 comments:

wonderwoman1975 said...

I liked your post and I love your style!!!

This is simply SUCH a charged issue. It's so hard to wrap our brains around the emotions and how to deal with them and what best to do, etc.

I admire your integrity to live your life honestly as you grapple these issues.

Cadence said...

I loved your post yesterday. It made me do some thinking about my willingness to take some hits for what I believe instead of just getting bogged down when I get angry or baffled or hurt.

I love your fearlessness, don't worry about the naysayers. As you yourself said, three years after committing to stronger and more public action, women had the vote.

alex said...

I'm so thrilled you wrote that post and created the group. I've been starting to pull away from Mormon Feminism because I'm no longer practicing, and felt like it's not my place. But I think I've found something to do now.

Julie said...

I'm in!

I love the idea of this. Even more so, I love the idea of actually carrying out some of the ideas that will come from this. I'm in. 100%.

P.s. I heart you. Still. Forever and always ( ;

Nathaniel said...

You are not dumb! Just wanted to make that clear.

Jessica said...

You're gonna get a 5. I'm gonna get a 5. We're both gonna get 5's.

Accidentalwriter said...

It is difficult to comprehend how a passionate desire for justice and equality can been seen in a negative light. There will always be differing opinions - and if these could be shared in a respectful and tolerant manner - how much progress and positive change could occur. Now I'll get my head back into the real world. I sincerely hope the Mormon Church will find a way to accommodate the views and opinions of those who feel disenfranchised by the current 'state of affairs'. Although my awareness of aspects of the LDS faith has broadened considerably over the last few months - I am still quite naive in terms of the machinations and politics of the Church. The one constant in every other struggle for justice and equality throughout history is the presence of human beings - and consequently; egos, the insatiable desire for power and control, the need for a 'class system', vested interests, fear of change of the status quo, (and that's before one really starts to think too seriously)! For some reason (probably infinite), religion seems to be the one element in life where negotiation and compromise are equated with sin and unfaithfulness - and to say the least, this is a fairly challenging base to initiate productive discussions. I struggle to see how significant change can occur without a 'splitting' of the Church - and I think history would probably atest to this. I can only imagine there are the relatively silent factions and those who are feeling incredibly disillusioned and marginalised. I pray that a modern day miracle can bring about the healing and goodwill necessary to enable the environment of love and compassion which would be required for a conscensus of principles and future directions to be reached. What a wonderful example this would be for the faiths of the world. I would like to say I am optimistic - if I was honest I think the chances are very slim.

The Dicksons said...

You are amazing. Thanks for being brave enough to publicly dissent.

Carolyn said...

Ha ha, I remember when I said my first swear word...

cracheld said...

"I think Civil Disobedience comes in the form of peaceful resistance, when we simply say "no" to things that hurt our souls."
Sigh. I think I have a lady crush.

Jamie said...

Do you read http://timandcait.blogspot.com/ ?

Jamie said...

Do you read http://timandcait.blogspot.com/ ?

Stephanie said...

@Jamie: No, but clearly I should. I loved her last post.

AzĂșcar said...

I feel a movement. I really do. Rock on, sister.

Brooke said...

I love the idea of a pray-in.

Heidi Stevenson said...

Quoted from you, I believe, on Facebook, "It's not a protest just a way to incite civil disobedience, while participating in the sacred ordinance of the sacrament." Sounds like a protest, no matter how you dress it. It also sounds like mockery, since you admit that the sacrament is a sacred ordinance, but are willing to use it to incite civil disobedience. If you feel you are doing right, you should have enough courage to claim it for what it is; otherwise, you should abandon it, because you know it's not right. I find it offensive that you would speak for women of the church and that you'd think all women should agree with you. Nope. I also find it offensive that you would actually use ADD as an excuse for such a calculated action. Many of us have ADD, but we still take responsibility for what we say and do and claim things for what they are.

Jen said...

Yay for Stephanie! You are awesome. I've been a Mormon Child Bride fan forever & I'm so proud of you! Yay for pants! You've started such a great discussion. I really hope church members are looking at themselves & reading all the mean comments & I soooo hope they realize there is a problem here. They are so mean! You are so nice. Keep up the good work sister!!!!

kiales said...

I'm a little confused, and since I don't have the time to read ALL of your blog posts to get my answer, I'll just ask :)

Are you/do you consider yourself a faithful Mormon woman? If yes, I guess I just missed some posts where you changed your mind about some things. If not, why is that your target audience? What ties you so strongly to this religion that, even though you disagree with some core doctrine, you want to stay involved with it and make changes to it? What keeps you from finding a new/different religion that aligns more closely with your own beliefs?

Thanks! <3

mckenzie said...

You are trying to change the church, or the social norms? I think that is where you need to be careful. The way people act and think in the church regarding dress is not a result of church doctrine in any way, but of western culture and isolated (utah) society. I think aiming a statement at the church is hurtful and causes contention. A conversation about love and respect would be more effective. Maybe outside of church, there are plenty of ways to get it going. Love begets love and not many people take wearing pants to church as a loving gesture. I think it feels a little "in your face" and gets people's hackles raised.

Jessica said...

I tried searching for the group on FB (I found your blog through FMH) but I can't find you! Can you add me? Or email me a link or something? j.morgan@zoho.com is the email linked with my FB :) I've loved stalking your blog all afternoon!

Jessica said...

I tried searching for the group on FB (I found your blog through FMH) but I can't find you! Can you add me? Or email me a link or something? j.morgan@zoho.com is the email linked with my FB :) I've loved stalking your blog all afternoon!