Ad

8/12/13

A Mother Here: Heavenly Mother Art and Poetry Contest



          One of the greatest and few joys in my faith transition was the discovery of Heavenly Mother. My mother had taught me about her, but I never heard about her in church or seminary. She was a foreign being to me, and now that I have my own daughter, it breaks my heart to think of a Mother, any Mother, being separated from her children for so long. My strongest spiritual moment happened while driving on State Street at 6:30 in the morning, and I prayed to a Heavenly Mother for the first time. I was surprised that the first feeling I felt was strength. I felt physically stronger, my thoughts clearer, and I was suddenly very aware of my own divinity, my own capacity for goodness. My spirit felt like it was a force for good. I think this is what happens when we start to see our own faces, our own gender, when we think of God. We become stronger and more powerful.

          I believe in the inherent divinity of women, and I'm supportive of people who incorporate the divine feminine in their worship. I believe an understanding of the divine feminine helps both men and women see each other as equals, and as divine creatures capable of more when we work together than when we work alone.

         I am very excited to announce a new project from A Mother There. They are hosting and art and poetry contest "celebrating the wondrous truth that we have a Heavenly Mother overseeing our spiritual development." They are awarding monetary prizes for submissions, and winners will be displayed on an online gallery.

        This project is currently being sponsored by WAVE, Peculiar Pages, Segullah, and Exponent II. However, it is currently only half funded. Please consider visiting the A Mother There website and making a donation. Entries to the contest are due March 14, 2014.


2 comments:

Kimberly Wilson said...

Not a mean commenter person, I promise. ;) And feel free to moderate this comment rather than posting it, and just respond to me via email: kimburlyandrob@gmail.com

This has nothing to do with recent posts (sorry, as I've told you, I haven't followed blogs in a long time), but I couldn't find you on fb today. Wanted to share two things w/ you. One was one of my son's class paperwork that came home last night; I was figuring you ought to write this language into your own first-of-the-year paperwork. It said something like "Work cannot be made up more than 3 days after its due [unless your kids has a 504 plan like mine due to drastic ADD issues]. . ." but here's the kicker that I liked; ". . .Do NOT come to me at the end of the quarter requesting to make up homework." In other words, work it out w/ the teacher before it becomes and end-of-the-term nightmare. Ha!

Secondly, if you haven't already seen this, I thought you'd like it: http://www.deseretnews.com/top/1760/60/Answer-Think-you-know-literature-See-if-you-recognize-these-famous-first-lines.html

I did terribly. Am reading "War & Peace" right now, so I actually got that one correct. Woot! Can't believe there weren't any quotes from "Tale of Two Cities."

Anyway. Hope you didn't unfriend me after meeting me and finding out that I grew up a Utah mormon. . . ;) Still want to email you YA books. Like Code Orange, Seedfolks, Feed, Rules of Survival, Acceleration, Divergent, The Fault in Our Stars (loved that one), Story of a Girl, etc. Because he loves post-apocalyptic dystopian-society novels, I lent him good ole' "The Alliance" by Gerald Lund. Quick high school read, and not religious (though awesome about the importance of agency, and the evils of said dystopian societies).

He has a fun chart for picking books to read, taken from teach.com: http://www.fmsenglish.com/books.html

Ok, I'll stop bugging you now. It was great to meet you!

Jenny said...

I used to read your blog and have rediscovered it. I really haven't been reading any blogs for about 6 months. Now I am finding that reading blogs like yours is helping me through a difficult time with how to handle my faith transition. I honestly do not know where I am going in this transition and where it will bring me and my 5 kids, but I am finding hope in blogs like yours.